Haiku…I’m still learning this form of Japanese poetry,so if you find there’s need for improvement please don’t hesitate to let me know,constructive criticism is always welcome,thank you very much.I do love composing these and reading others.

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came summer peaked love
life-filled love singing twirling–

cicadas near death

©Seema Tabassum 2016
©lifeshues.org 2016

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life dampened love’s growth
swelled spaces eroded love–

stream banks in tsuyu

©Seema Tabassum 2016
©lifeshues.org 2016
All content and images copyright 2016
All rights reserved

picture courtesy : https://unsplash.com

*Tsuyu is the rainy season which arrives before summer in Japan.

Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry, consisting of 17 morae (or on), in three metrical phrases of 5, 7 and 5 morae respectively,these typically contain a kigo, or seasonal reference, and a kireji, or verbal caesura(cutting word).English-language haiku poets think of this as a Japanese form of poetry generally (but not always) consisting of 17 syllables, usually within three lines, with 5, 7 and 5 syllables.In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line, while in English these usually appear in three lines, to parallel the three metrical phrases of the Japanese form. The essential element of form in English-language is that each haiku is a short one-breath poem that usually contains a juxtaposition of images.Most writers prefer poems that refer to nature and social events, but some of them don’t always place an exacting seasonal word in the poem. Furthermore, a few of them compose on one or two lines in less than 17 syllables. Currently the majority of poems in this form are written in 11 short syllables in a 3-5-3 format.
Senryu is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 or fewer morae (or on) in total. However, senryu tend to be about human foibles while haiku tend to be about nature, and senryu are often cynical or darkly humorous while the other is more serious. Unlike haiku, senryu do not include a kireji or verbalcaesura (cutting word), and do not generally include a kigo, or seasonal word.It is often said that both forms can be funny, but that if it’s funny, it’s probably senryu. Both can be about nature, but if it’s about nature, it’s probably a haiku. In addition, both can be about nature or human nature. Both can be serious or humorous/satirical. A serious poem about nature is certainly a haiku. And a funny/satirical poem about human nature is certainly a senryu.
information courtesy : akitahaiku.com

Please click here for another post of mine on this form of Japanese poetry.